Nice Nîmes

 

james-in-colisseum

The sun beat down as we walked past the Ancient Roman coliseum. We were in Nîmes, a town in southern France roughly halfway between Spain and Italy. I was confused as to why we walked past the coliseum, instead of going in, but I held my tongue, and soon learned why we had passed the coliseum. We were meeting up with our friends from Amsterdam.

james-and-asher-stairsYou’ll remember from my post Amazing Amsterdam Part 2 that Asher is a lot like me. Really, if you ever got to know him, you would believe me. We talked for hours about various things: about a game I recently started playing called Civilization Revolution, about a game that he’s addicted to called Kerble Space Program, about my drafts for sci-fi novels, etc, etc. In fact, Asher even helped me make my stories more like real life. The big thing we discussed is that we agreed to both write half of a realistic, scientific comedy. Most of the time we were talking, we were waiting for dinner, but before dinner, we visited the coliseum from the beginning of the day, Maison Carrée, a former temple, and other old, cool sites.

colisseum-at-night
The amazing coliseum!

The coliseum, built in 70 A.D, was almost intact, though not at its former glory. We learned a lot about gladiator fights. First off, gladiators went to schools to learn their skills, and represented their schools in their fights. Second, gladiators were rarely killed. When a gladiator fell, the crowd would scream out, giving their input. The guy in charge would then decide whether to give the signal for killing the fallen man, pointing his thumb at him, or to spare him, the sign being to clench his fist with his thumb inside it. If a gladiator was killed, the guy in charge would have to pay a large fee to the gladiator school.

Asher and I hangin' at the Maison Carree
Asher and I hangin’ at the Maison Carrée

Maison Carrée, which, as I said, had once been a temple, now has another use. It currently houses a short film of some of Nîmes’ history with the Romans. The short film was very interesting. It told of Nîmes’s founding, and then of how its culture changed, back in Roman times. At first, the area of Nîmes was very Gaul. They worshiped Nemausus, and then they became more Roman, made wine, worshiped Roman gods, etc.

Exploring the Temple of Diana
Exploring the Temple of Diana

After watching the short film, we went to a small, cute little park, and to another temple, this one mostly in ruins, the Temple of Diana. It was very small, so there wasn’t much to see there, but it was still pretty amazing. It’s amazing that it’s still there.

reading-with-asher
Asher introducing me to “Timmy Failure”.

After visiting the wonderful, yet small and ruined Temple of Diana, we climbed up a hill, and then to the top of Tour Magne, an old Roman tower which was one of the eight towers that used to be part of the city walls. There wasn’t much room at the top. In fact, there was more room at the bottom than at the top! The top was basically a balcony. However, the view was amazing. We stared off into the distance, our gazes sweeping across the whole town… to the horizon.

We also visited this amazing Roman Aqueduct near Nimes, the Pont du Gard.
We also visited this amazing Roman Aqueduct near Nîmes, the Pont du Gard.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Nice Nîmes

  1. Hi James,

    A most interesting post! The coliseum in Nice is in so much better condition than that in Rome! It must have been really interesting to explore. Actually, a gladiators life was not so nice. Many were slaves conscripted against their will from other nations by the Romans. The battles between gladiator & wild animal quite often did not have pleasant outcomes. It’s a shame that the Temple of Diana that you visited was so small and uninspiring. She was actually quite an important goddess in the Roman pantheon.

    Please keep the posts coming. I love reading them & seeing the pictures! Love, Pattie

    Like

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