GIASCO Fundraiser

Photo courtesy of GIASCO
Photo courtesy of GIASCO

Do you remember my post, GIASCO Boys? It is a post about the boys that GIASCO (Getting Involved with African Street Children Organization) takes care of. Twenty-nine former street children are given food, water, shelter, and education. Click the link to read the full post.

When we were with the boys in Jinja in Mid-July, we donated mattresses, sheets, and mattress protectors because that was what they needed most. Now I am raising money to buy shoes for them. They do have shoes, but those are their school shoes and they cannot wear them during free time.

The shoes will be given to them on August 14, during their annual birthday party. We have until July 31 to donate. We are trying to raise $450(about £290 British Pounds) for shoes for all 29 of the boys. To donate, click below. Be sure to type “SHOES” in the message box of your donation form. Will you PLEEEEEEEASE help me buy shoes for the boys?

To Donate:
Click on link below, then scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the blue “Support GI ASCO” box Click here to donate.

GIASCO Boys

GIASCO Boys

On Monday, July 13, we heard of an organization for street boys, Getting Involved with African Street Children Organization (GIASCO). It is run by Gerald, the bar manager at our hostel and his wife, Sarah. We heard about it by talking to him and Sophie, who was a nursing student for another organization in Jinja for the summer. We decided to check it out. We went to the home were the street boys lived.

It had a nice big yard, a big dining room, a medium-sized kitchen, and an outside kitchen/office, as far as I saw. The dining room was also the entry room, and it had a very accurate map, and the reason I consider it accurate is because it included South Sudan, which most maps don’t do. It also showed every flag of every country. It was a nice place, and it was just as good of a organization. The boys are provided with food, water, shelter, and education. The organization pays for their school fees, because school in Uganda is not free.

I played a little soccer with the boys. We ate dinner with the boys. It was posho and beans. Posho is like Ugali, which is like a cake made of maize with no icing. It is not sweet at all. It is bland on its own, but with something else it tastes just like that other thing. The boys were really nice.